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Finding Their Own Home

We first met Cameron and Bonnie Hopper after DHS referred them to us. We work together with DHS to help families reunify with their children. Both dad and mom were completing substance abuse treatment programs. Our transitional housing offered them the opportunity to lease a low-cost unit for up to two years. They would have to continue in programs of recovery, but they would receive support not only from one of our case managers, but also from DHS staff.

Shortly after moving in to a 3-bedroom unit, they were reunited with their children Sidney (age 3), Tyler (age 5) and Stephen (age 11). Cameron and Bonnie started recovery programs and worked with our case manager to maintain their sobriety. While living in our transitional housing, they received weekly food from our Feeding Umpqua regional food bank as part of our Harvest Share Program.

After their two-year lease period ended, we were able to offer them an apartment at Camas Ridge, another alcohol and drug free development. As this is permanent housing, as long as tenants stay within income guidelines, they are allowed to remain in their units for any number of years. If a household goes over income guidelines, depending on how much their income is, they may be able to stay, but they will have to pay more for rent than other tenants.

The Hoppers lives further stabilized at Camas Ridge. Not only did they continue in recovery, both parents were able to obtain good employment. Cameron got hired on as a logging truck driver. Bonnie was hired by Mercy Medical Center to perform high level custodial work.

This did raise their income leaving them fearful that they would no longer be able to rent with us. Though it turned out they could stay in our housing, they realized after meeting with our property manager that they had a better opportunity to rent their own house for less money. Their new home is substantially larger than their current apartment, with four bedrooms.

Now Sidney, Tyler and Stephen each have a bedroom of their own, and the Hoppers no longer need to rely on our housing.

Newsletters

Shaun Pritchard
Newsletters

Letter from the Executive Director – Winter 2023

UCAN is known locally as an agency that addresses poverty, providing an array of services so local folks live self-sufficient lives. But our work goes well beyond addressing poverty. We play a major role in supporting the health and well-being of our residents. To find out how we improve health, click here.

Volunteers Needed for Roseburg and Grants Pass Warming Centers
Newsletters

Volunteers Needed for Roseburg and Grants Pass Warming Centers

If you have some availability this winter, you could make a huge difference in your community by volunteering at a UCAN warming center. Not only will you provide comfort to our homeless neighbors, you will reduce the burden otherwise faced by local emergency rooms. UCAN will be supporting center operations, but without volunteers, we won’t be able to operate them. Click here to learn more about the vital role you can play in your community.

The Point-In-Time Count: A Day of Caring for Our Homeless
Newsletters

The Point-In-Time Count: A Day of Caring for Our Homeless

On January 24, 2024, UCAN will host events in both Douglas and Josephine County for local homeless residents. Those attending will have opportunities to meet with many agencies, obtain services, and receive much needed supplies. Learn more about the events here.